Conference Schedule

Annual Conference sessions are mapped by P-5 Competency Domains. Please navigate the Annual Conference schedule using the Day tabs and Session Type tabs. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Print Conference Schedule

Day 01 full schedule

October 25, 2021

Opening Plenary - Recognize Emotions to Take Action Through Transformative Cultural Rituals and Routines: Reflections on Robert Emde

In 2020, the American Professional Society of Child Abuse declared that racism is a form of psychological maltreatment. The growing population of multicultural, immigrant, and refugee children and families require culturally valid theories and research to identify strengths and vulnerabilities for effective practice and inclusive policies. Findings from research unpack caregiver emotions that serve as mediators and moderators of bias and colorism on the acceptance and rejection of children. Take heart in strategies to promote awareness of race-based emotional responses and transform practice to include empathic attunement with the humanity of diverse people.  Robert (Bob) Emde explored development from the perspective of continuity and transformational change. Great change requires upheaval. Effective action requires reflection and recognition of the role of intense emotions in relationships. Amid atrocities, we can raise our collective consciousness and advance essential transformations—together. 

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Marva Lewis, PhD, Tulane University of Social Work

Issue Intensive A – Part 1: Holding Steady While Moving Ahead—Exploring the Process of Making Meaning

The dramatic circumstances of the past year and a half have provided an opportunity for critical self-reflection and examination of practices in the infant and early childhood mental health field related to the meaningful promotion of social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Part 1 of this session will be a discussion of one such organization’s process. The Reflective Supervision Collaborative had their work reviewed by a diverse panel of reflective supervision experts to consider ways that the project could more effectively infuse issues of social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion and then brought these reviewers into the group to work together to expand cherished ideas related to reflective supervision. Part 1 will provide a discussion of this process including the tensions that arose, approaches used to move ideas ahead, and the deepening and expansion of ideas that ensued.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Mary Claire Heffron, PhD, Private Practice; Salam Soliman, PsyD, Child First; Carmen Rosa Norona , LICSW, MsED, CEIS, Child Witness to Violence Project at Boston Medical Center; Kadija Johnston, MSW, Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development

Issue Intensive B – Part 1: Better Than Nothing or Better Than Anything? Virtual Contact With Families and Lessons Learned From the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound influence on the functioning of both families of young children and the providers of services who support these families. This Issue Intensive will explore how early childhood mental health providers and home visitors pivoted to virtual contact with families in the past year and a half. We will use voices from the field to highlight both the challenges and opportunities this massive shift has presented to early childhood services going forward.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Jon Korfmacher, PhD, Erikson Institute; Mark Innocenti, PhD, Utah State University; Falana Coleman-Zamora, AM, LCSW, Children’s Home + Aid; Cristina Galto, LCSW, Dawn Institute and Arizona State University; Paula Zeanah, PhD, Tulane University; and Megan Campbell, Community Action Inc. of Central Texas

Issue Intensive A – Part 2: Holding Steady While Moving Ahead—Exploring the Process of Making Meaning

The dramatic circumstances of the past year and a half have provided an opportunity for critical self-reflection and examination of practices in the infant and early childhood mental health field related to the meaningful promotion of social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Part 2 will be a set of interactive experiences designed to help participants explore and learn from one another how heightened awareness of social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion have impacted reflective supervision and organizational processes in their settings in the past year.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Mary Claire Heffron, PhD, Private Practice; Salam Soliman, PsyD, Child First; Carmen Rosa Norona , LICSW, MsED, CEIS, Child Witness to Violence Project at Boston Medical Center; Kadija Johnston, MSW, Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development

Issue Intensive B – Part 2: Better Than Nothing or Better Than anything? Virtual contact With Families and Lessons Learned From the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound influence on the functioning of both families of young children and the providers of services who support these families. This Issue Intensive will explore how early childhood mental health providers and home visitors pivoted to virtual contact with families in the past year and a half. We will use voices from the field to highlight both the challenges and opportunities this massive shift has presented to early childhood services going forward.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Jon Korfmacher, PhD, Erikson Institute; Mark Innocenti, PhD, Utah State University; Falana Coleman-Zamora, AM, LCSW, Children’s Home + Aid; Cristina Galto, LCSW, Dawn Institute and Arizona State University; Paula Zeanah, PhD, Tulane University; and Megan Campbell, Community Action Inc. of Central Texas

Breakout A1 – HealthySteps Toward Equity: Addressing Health Disparities at Well-Child Visits Through Integrated Behavioral Health Practice

Health disparities for families of color are well documented within pediatric primary care settings. This presentation will discuss health disparities that impact well-child care in early childhood, describe how HealthySteps functions to mitigate disparities, and explore practice transformation opportunities through the delivery of integrated behavioral health services and supports.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Melissa Buchholz, PsyD, Devin Fields, PsyD, Catherine Wolcott, PhD, and Ayelet Talmi, PhD, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine

Breakout A2 – Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative: Building and Sustaining a Birth-5 Early Learning System

This session will focus on essential elements of building and sustaining a community-based birth-5 program by collaborating with community stakeholders, partnering with families, using infant mental health principles, and advancing racial equity, diversity, and inclusion. Participants will also consider how these principles can be used in their respective communities.

P-5 Icons_Dom 1

Kimberly P. Diamond-Berry, PhD, IECMH-E®, HighScope Educational Research Foundation and Nkechy Ezeh, EdD, Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative

Breakout A3 – Humanizing Black Children: Race and Emotional Learning

This presentation will focus on the intersection between race/racism and emotional development in preschool settings. Participants will be provided with a set of emotionally supportive practices, for particular use with Black children and boys, to support emotional learning and existing emotional development curricula.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Evandra Catherine, PhD, Arizona State University

Breakout A4 – Using Reflective Practice to Inform In-Person Versus Telehealth Service Delivery in a Post-Pandemic World

As we transition post-pandemic from the necessity of telehealth services, practitioners need to contemplate service delivery modalities. This presentation offers a model based in reflective practice to support decision-making between telehealth and in-person services. Our model, illustrated by case examples, includes social justice issues, systemic factors, and perspectives of all stakeholders.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Claire Noonan, PhD and Michelle Roy, PhD, IMH-E®, Mental Health Center of Denver

Breakout A5 – Cultivating Mindfulness to Support Early Childhood Professionals

Through brief presentations, discussion, and mindfulness practice, participants will learn about innovative approaches to integrating mindfulness and compassion within three different early childhood settings, a behavioral health center, a home visiting program, and a county agency that provides professional development and training for early childhood educators. Presenters will share their experience bringing mindfulness approaches to their organizations to support workforce well-being, quality, and teamwork with an aim to transform organizational culture.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Maria J. Gehl, MSW, ZERO TO THREE; Debbie Manigat, MS, DMFT©, Children’s Services Council of Palm Beach County (CSCPBC); Jennifer Mitchell, PhD, BCBA-D, The Children's Center; and Claudia M. Lara, MA, IMH-E®, Arizona State University

Baby Talk 1 – Grand Connections

Grandparents are a critical part of our nation’s child care system. Join us to learn about a new curriculum for grandparents that builds knowledge of current child development and child-rearing practices, and strategies for partnering with adult children. We will also share lessons learned and critical success factors from pilot participants.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

Kathy Kinsner, MS Ed, ZERO TO THREE

Baby Talk 2 – The Way We Speak: Understanding the Historical Context of African American Vernacular English

One of the essential elements in my session is to share the historical context and the grammar structure of African American Vernacular English to help educators understand its uniqueness, as well as the importance of validating the child's home language in the learning environment.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Tiffany Grant, First Children's Finance/Excell Academy for Higher Learning

Baby Talk 3 – Supporting the Linguistically Diverse Workforce in the Early Childhood Education System

Research demonstrates that teachers who share home languages with the infants and toddlers in their care are better able to support these children’s linguistic development at its most crucial moment. Learn how Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) can design programs that support the linguistically diverse workforce.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Anna Loakimedes, MPP, Early Edge California; Giselle Navarro-Cruz, PhD, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; and Carolyne Crolotte, MEd, Early Edge California

Breakout B1 – Compassionate Response: A Public Health-First Responder Partnership to Promote Trauma-Informed Approaches and Young Children's Resilience

First responder interactions with families and young children are often stressful or frightening. Through a citywide cross-agency partnership, we offer a strategies-focused training that is grounded in trauma-informed care principles and promotes child resilience. Join us to learn about the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Compassionate Response curriculum.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Abigail M. Jewkes Velikov, PhD, EdM, NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene; and Rebecca Parlakian, MA Ed, ZERO TO THREE

Breakout B2 – Advancing the Infant/Toddler Workforce: Where Can We Go From Here

Data show there is racial inequity within the infant/toddler workforce. In order to improve pay parity, lack of access to benefits, and working conditions for Women of Color, we must pay close attention to this inequity by identifying gaps and strategies to remove barriers in local, state, and federal early childhood education systems.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Alexa Watkins, MEd, and April Westermann, MEd, ICF

Breakout B3 – Advancing Equity in Early Childhood Education Takes Heart Work

The breakout session will provide information about advancing equity in early childhood education though intentional practice by using the "Start With Equity" 14 Priorities to Dismantle Systemic Racism in Early Childhood Education.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Lisa M. Wilson, MEd, ZERO TO THREE

Breakout B4 – A Framework to Honor Cultural Diversity in Reflective Practice Facilitation

The presenters will offer a framework for participants to better integrate culturally responsive practices into their reflective practice facilitation. Through didactic teaching, supervision case examples, and reflection opportunities, the presenters will illustrate ways in which reflective practice can be made more equitable and inclusive of practitioners of all backgrounds.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Vasudha Narasimha, LCSW, IFECMHS, RPF II, Dear Families; and Julia Bantimba, MS, OTR/L, ECMHS, RPF II, Seneca Family of Agencies

Breakout B5 - The New Frontier: Infant and Early Childhood Tele-Mental Health Care

There is a perception that tele-mental health care with young children and families cannot compare in quality or effectiveness to in-person care. During the last 18+ months when providers had to deliver the majority of care via zoom, we discovered that tele-mental health care for young children and families works. In this session, presenters will use clinical vignettes to illustrate how early childhood tele-mental health care: (1) improves access and convenience; (2) is as effective as in-person care; (3) increases engagement; (4) reduces no-shows; and (5) provides a new lens for understanding the family’s homelife. They will conclude with recommendations for “promising practices” in providing tele-mental health care to young children and families.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Helen Egger MD, Little Otter Co-Founder and Chief Medical and Scientific Officer; and Claire Lerner, MSW, Little Otter Advisor

Day 02 full schedule

October 26, 2021

Practice Plenary: Beliefs about Children: An Old Practice Renewed, An Old Tradition Re-Established

There is the concept of Sacred Bundles that are used in traditional ceremonies of American Indian spiritual teachings. This presentation will provide an understanding of the Sacred Bundle of life from conception, birth, infancy, and early childhood with stories, teachings, examples, and images. Teachings will cover how children are viewed and expectations with the concept of a Sacred Bundle. 

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Dolores Subia BigFoot, PhD, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Issue Intensive C – Part 1: How All Children and Families Can Blossom Through Nature-Based Mindfulness

Come explore the powerful potential of nature to broadly support early childhood development. This Issue Intensive will review research demonstrating how nature-based interventions can improve health and well-being for young children and families. Participants will learn nature-based mindfulness practices that center equity and can be shared with very young children and their caregivers.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Issue Intensive D – Part 1: DC:0–5 Turns 5: Updates, Impacts, and Reach of the "DC:0–5: Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders" in Infancy and Early Childhood

This Issue Intensive is intended for intermediate-advanced audiences interested in learning about DC:0–5™ since its publication 5 years ago. Hear reflections from Dr. Charles Zeanah on this diagnostic classification system as it has been used over the years. Gain familiarity with the DC:0–5 as a multiaxial, developmentally appropriate, contextually driven, and culturally responsive diagnostic classification system. Learn about DC:0–5 training around the world and results of a recent survey of clinicians trained in DC:0–5 about its use in practice.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Charles Zeanah, MD, Tulane University; Kathleen Mulrooney, MA, LPC, and Noelle Hause, EdD, LPC, IMH-E® Mentor (Clinical), ZERO TO THREE; Marian Williams, PhD, and Ashley Rediker, PsyD, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and University of Southern California

Issue Intensive C – Part 2: How All Children and Families Can Blossom Through Nature-Based Mindfulness

Come explore the powerful potential of nature to broadly support early childhood development. This Issue Intensive will review research demonstrating how nature-based interventions can improve health and well-being for young children and families. Participants will learn nature-based mindfulness practices that center equity and can be shared with very young children and their caregivers.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Issue Intensive D – Part 2: DC:0–5 Turns 5: Updates, Impacts, and Reach of the "DC:0–5: Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders" in Infancy and Early Childhood

This Issue Intensive is intended for intermediate-advanced audiences interested in learning about DC:0–5™ since its publication 5 years ago. Hear reflections from Dr. Charles Zeanah on this diagnostic classification system as it has been used over the years. Gain familiarity with the DC:0–5 as a multiaxial, developmentally appropriate, contextually driven, and culturally responsive diagnostic classification system. Learn about DC:0–5 training around the world and results of a recent survey of clinicians trained in DC:0–5 about its use in practice.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Charles Zeanah, MD, Tulane University; Kathleen Mulrooney, MA, LPC, and Noelle Hause, EdD, LPC, IMH-E® Mentor (Clinical), ZERO TO THREE; Marian Williams, PhD, and Ashley Rediker, PsyD, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and University of Southern California

Breakout C1 – At the Feet of Storytellers: The Development of Early Relational Health Conversations

We describe findings from an investigation of thoughts, observations, and experiences of African American families and HealthySteps Specialists of color with Early Relational Health (ERH) screening. Findings led to development of Early Relational Health Conversations, a family- and culture-centered model for ERH screening. Eight components and implications for antibias practice will be presented.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Marie-Celeste Condon, PhD, private practice; Dominique Charlot-Swilley, PhD, Georgetown Center for Child and Human Development, Children's National Hospital; and Tininka Rahman, MHCA, Clark Parent-Child Network, Children's National Hospital

Breakout C2 – Realizing the Promise of Early Educator Apprenticeships

Early educator apprenticeships and residency programs have the potential to transform both the quality of childcare and the access the early care and education field has to high quality professional learning and higher education. The disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic coupled with projections related to ongoing turnover in the field indicate that the need to invest in robust workforce development initiatives will be particularly acute in the coming years. And because the skills, knowledge, and competencies of those who teach and care for young children is the most impactful element of an ECE program, it is essential to create professional development pathways for childcare teachers that lead to higher credentials, recognize their existing skills, and compensate them justly. New Federal funds, including the American Rescue Plan Act (“ARPA”), offer a critical opportunity to invest in the necessary one-time planning costs to establish high-quality residency or apprenticeship programs for early childhood educators. In this workshop, members of the Learning Starts At Birth initiative at Bank Street College will share key design recommendations, cost considerations, and a free cost estimation tool for states, cities, and communities interested in establishing robust apprenticeship/residency models that support the ECE workforce in the complex task of fostering the foundation of early learning.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Brandy Jones Lawrence, MPP, Bank Street College Education Center; and Randi B. Wolfe, EdM, PhD, Early Care & Education Pathways to Success (ECEPTS)

Breakout C3 – White Supremacy Blind Spot Buster: Self-Compassion That Links Awareness With Action

Many people have read books like "How to Be an Anti-Racist" and still struggle to connect that awareness to daily action. Participants will use self-compassion and body-based exercises as a bridge between awareness and action. Participants will use this framework to address oppression in their contexts.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Nat Vikitsreth, DT, EdM, LSW, CEIM, Come Back to Care; and Siemone Smith, LPC, Fussy Baby Network

Breakout C4 – Our Moment of Reckoning: Advancing Racial Equity in All Levels Of IECMHC

What role does Infant Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (IECMHC) play in closing racial disparities? Join us in an important conversation about racial equity and how personal, mindful transformation translates into effective practice and policy. We will discuss research, effective professional development strategies, leadership development, policy/systems, and reflective supervision.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Eva Marie Shivers, JD, PhD, Indigo Cultural Center; Tonia M. Spence, LCSW, MSEd, The Jewish Board; and Meghan Schmelzer, LMSW, IECMH-E®, ZERO TO THREE Policy Center

Baby Talk 4 – Developmentally Appropriate Practice and Advancing Equity: What Educators Should Know About NAEYC’s Newest Position Statements

This session focuses on key messages from both NAEYC's Advancing Equity and DAP Position Statements. The presenter will highlight tools and resources all educators who work with young children (teachers, program directors, trainers) can use as they advance equity and offer joyful learning opportunities in their work with young children.

P-5 Icons_Dom 1

Susan B. Friedman, MA, NAEYC

Baby Talk 5 – Somos Las FAVAS: FFN Care That Is "For Latinx, By Latinx"

This session will focus on our community-participatory, culturally relevant, liberation-framed approach to infancy and early childhood mental health consultation (IECMHC) for Latinx Friends, Family, and Neighbors child care providers (FAVAS). Participants will learn through narrative examples from the FAVAS themselves regarding their experiences co-creating a program both for them and by them.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Elizabeth (Buffy) Trent Wolf, PsyD, IMH-E®, and Brandon Barbour, LSW, La Cocina

Baby Talk 6 – Promoting Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health: A Teleconsultation Pilot for Cross-Sector Early Childhood Providers

The session reviews a statewide teleconsultation pilot, beginning with concept formation and steps leading to implementation, and transitioning to an overview of the components of the teleconsultation pilot. Participants will explore initial outcomes and challenges within the pilot and reflect on ways to incorporate similar practices in their own work.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Jennifer Mitchell, PhD, BCBA-D, The Children's Center

Breakout D1 – Hospital to Home: Supports for Medically Fragile Infants, Young Children, and Families (Kathryn Barnard Legacy Session)

Medically fragile children and parents may experience trauma related to hospitalization and treatments. COVID-19 amplifies the risk for trauma because of limitations of parental presence. This session emphasizes an infant mental health and trauma perspective aimed at “frontline” workers who care for vulnerable infants and families in hospitals and communities.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Denise M. Findlay, RN, BSN, PGCert IPMH, University of Washington; Paula D. Zeanah, PhD, MSN, RN, LGMC/OLOL, University of Louisiana; Joy V. Browne, PhD, PCNS, IMH-E®, University of Colorado; and Debbie Cheatham, MS, DNP, ZERO TO THREE

Breakout D2 – Integrating Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological Model Into Reflective Case Consultation

Engaging in reflective practice throughout the life of a case provides opportunities to strengthen our approach to families and build system capacity. Reflective case consultation promotes nuanced and holistic thinking. This presentation explores how reflective inquiry within a bioecological framework supports identification of strengths and needs of a family system.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Mike Sherman, PsyD, Amy L. Huffer, PhD, LCSW, IMH-E (IV-C)®, and Gwen Doland, MS, LMHC, CADC, ZERO TO THREE Infant-Toddler Court Program

Breakout D3 – Examining a Process for Indigenous Language/Culture Curriculum Development in a Tribal Nation Early Learning Program

This session engages attendees in the process of Indigenous culture/language curriculum in birth-to-age-3 classrooms in a tribal nation early learning center. Attendees will hear how language/culture and classroom teachers have come together to develop land-based and tribally specific curriculum and consider opportunities for applying the work in their respective settings.

P-5 Icons_Dom 5

Anna Lees, EdD, Western Washington University

Breakout D4 – Assume Competence: Working Better With Parents With Intellectual/Developmental Disability and Their Young Children

Outcomes for young children of parents with intellectual disabilities are often correlated with a lack of supports and resources, rather than parental IQ. Parents may face stigma, stereotypes, and poverty, and may not understand mainstream parenting information. We serve families better using competence-based strategies, rather than acting on deficit-based assumptions.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

S. Auguste Elliott, PhD, LP-D, RPT-S, The Association for Successful Parenting; Nicole Brisson, PhD, LMHC, Sage Haven Associates; and Lindsay Brillhart, parent, self-advocate, and Secretary of the Board of Directors of TASP, The Association for Successful Parenting

Day 03 full schedule

October 27, 2021

Science Plenary: Resilience in Development: Vulnerability and Opportunity in Early Childhood

Professor Masten will present a contemporary perspective on multisystem resilience in development and its implications for protecting young children. She will highlight lessons from research on resilience in the context of adversity during early childhood, drawing examples from her own research and the global literature on resilience in diverse conditions of threat, including the COVID-19 pandemic.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Ann S. Masten, PhD, University of Minnesota

Issue Intensive E – Part 1: Creating Humanizing and Equitable Virtual Learning

Attendees are encouraged to come build their practice in humanizing virtual learning and integrate evidence-informed applications available in the early childhood education field to support their creation of cutting-edge virtual learning. The first part of this session will focus on practical strategies for trainers and professional development creators to design humanizing and equitable virtual learning spaces. The second part of the session will build on current science and unique models of adult learning and professional development.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Renee Marshall, MA Ed, MA Ed Leadership and Administration, Educational Consultant; Lisa Wilson, MEd, and Brittany King, ZERO TO THREE

Issue Intensive F – Part 1: Autism in a Time of COVID: Impact of Chronic Stress and Trauma

Children with autism are as diverse as anyone else and possess emotional lives and inner selves. They are impacted by the stressors that have been a part of the COVID experience as have other children and are also susceptible to toxic stress and traumatic events. This session will explore how children with autism experience and express stress through symptoms, play, and development. The interface of the Developmental, Individual-Difference, Relationship-Based (DIR) model and infant and early childhood mental health, as well as trauma-informed interventions, will be examined addressing similarities and differences in concept and practice. Specific attention will be given to the individual differences, family culture, developmental progress, and trauma responses. Consideration will be paid, throughout, to the contributions of development and relationships, including case vignettes. The outcome of a pilot study using an integrated DIR/Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) approach for preschool children with autism/other developmental problems and a trauma history will be presented.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Serena Wieder, PhD, Profectum Foundation; Gilbert Foley, EdD, The New York Center for Child Development; and Barbara Stroud, PhD, private practice

Issue Intensive E – Part 2: Creating Humanizing and Equitable Virtual Learning

Attendees are encouraged to come build their practice in humanizing virtual learning and integrate evidence-informed applications available in the early childhood education field to support their creation of cutting-edge virtual learning. The first part of this session will focus on practical strategies for trainers and professional development creators to design humanizing and equitable virtual learning spaces. The second part of the session will build on current science and unique models of adult learning and professional development.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Renee Marshall, MA Ed, MA Ed Leadership and Administration, Educational Consultant; Lisa Wilson, MEd, and Brittany King, ZERO TO THREE

Issue Intensive F – Part 2: Autism in a Time of COVID: Impact of Chronic Stress and Trauma

Children with autism are as diverse as anyone else and possess emotional lives and inner selves. They are impacted by the stressors that have been a part of the COVID experience as have other children and are also susceptible to toxic stress and traumatic events. This session will explore how children with autism experience and express stress through symptoms, play, and development. The interface of DIR and infant and early childhood mental health, as well as trauma-informed interventions, will be examined, addressing similarities and differences in concept and practice. Specific attention will be given to the individual differences, family culture, developmental progress, and trauma responses. Consideration will be paid, throughout, to the contributions of development and relationships, including case vignettes. The outcome of a pilot study using an integrated DIR/CPP approach for preschool children with autism/other developmental problems and a trauma history will be presented.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Serena Wieder, PhD, Profectum Foundation; Gilbert Foley, EdD, The New York Center for Child Development; and Barbara Stroud, PhD, private practice

Breakout E1 – Implementation Fidelity Within HealthySteps: Facilitators, Barriers, and Lessons Learned From Three Primary Care Clinics

This session will share insights from three primary care clinics’ experiences with implementing HealthySteps with fidelity to the model. It will discuss fidelity and its importance in achieving outcomes, facilitators, and barriers to achieving fidelity, and specific strategies clinics have incorporated to strengthen implementation.

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Colleen Morrison, PhD, James Bell Associates; DeAnn K. Davies, MS, CLC, IPMH, Summit Healthcare Regional Medical Center; Lance Till, MS, James Bell Associates; Laura Ibanez Gomez, LMSW, Family Health Centers at NYU Langone; and Alix McNulty, MSN, Advocate Children’s Hospital

Breakout E2 – Implementing Standardized Assessment in Safe Baby Courts Utilizing the Toddler/Infant Needs and Strengths (TINS)

The TINS is a standardized assessment that child welfare teams serving infants and young children can use to identify needs and strengths in the child and family. This session will overview the implementation of TINS in Tennessee’s Safe Baby Court program. Didactic presentation, discussion, and case examples will be utilized.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Giovanni Billings, PsyD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Mindy Kronenberg, PhD, private practice; Kathy Gracey, MEd, Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Jennifer Fisher, LMSW, Tennessee Department of Children's Services; and Stephanie Etheridge, Tennessee Administrative Office of the Courts

Breakout E3 – Promoting Equity and Improved Outcomes Through the Use of Implementation Science: Research Practice Partnerships

Have you tried to implement an evidence-based curriculum or innovation, only to find it doesn’t work or can't be sustained in your agency and community? This session will detail approaches to using implementation science strategies to interrupt long-standing concerns such as the disproportionate use of exclusionary practices.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Erin Kinavey Wennerstrom, MEd, IMH-E®, Raviant, LLC; Meghan Johnson, MS, Thread; and Sondra Stegenga, PhD, MS, OTR/L, University of Utah

Breakout E4 – Neurological Responsiveness: Modifying Interactions With Families to Support Communication

Responding to diversity is enhanced by recognizing the unique learning patterns present. This session explores the neurological foundations of knowledge processing, memory put-down, communication modes, and motivation/value systems. Emphasis is on making slight interaction adjustments that will increase understanding, responsiveness, and engagement of families, especially those needing extensive support.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

Maria C. Sargent, PhD, Ashland University

Baby Talk 7 – The Importance of Perinatal Support During COVID-19: The Mother-Infant Support Team

The session will describe the importance of providing support to high-risk women during the perinatal period. Providing support during COVID-19 was important and the women appreciated having someone to listen to them. The goal of this program is to improve outcomes and support maternal and infant well-being.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

Joy D. Osofsky, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Baby Talk 8 – Motivational Interviewing to Enhance High-Quality Home Visiting Practices

This presentation focuses on using motivational interviewing (MI) to enhance family-centered practices to increase positive home visitor practices as measured by the Home Visit Rating Scales (HOVRS). MI used collaboratively with the HOVRS contributes to accomplishing family goals while maintaining a strengths-based approach and better engaging families in the process.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

Mark S. Innocenti, PhD, Utah State University; Karin M. Wilson, MA, Theory to Action, LLC; and Lori Roggman, PhD, Utah State University

Baby Talk 9 – Reflective Practice in Infant/Toddler Court Programs: An Assessment of Implementation and Impact of FAN

Implementing Facilitating Attuned Interactions (FAN) within an Infant/Toddler Court program provides a guiding framework for reflective practice, a guide to team interactions through the ARC of Engagement, and a shared vocabulary on infant and early childhood mental health core concepts. This presentation will look at the implementation and impact of FAN into Tennessee's Infant/Toddler Court Program.

P-5 Icons_Dom 3

Alison D Peak LCSW, IMH-E®, Allied Behavioral Health Solutions; Linda Gilkerson, PhD, LSW, Erikson Institute; and Leanne Kallemeyn, PhD, Loyola University-Chicago

Breakout F1 – Engaging Biological Caregivers in Trauma Treatment for Children in Foster Care: CPP, PCIT, TF-CBT considerations

This presentation will review current guidelines for incorporating biological caregivers into trauma treatment for young children in foster care. Case examples within Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) will be used to illustrate these considerations.

P-5 Icons_Dom 2

Sufna John, PhD, Glenn Mesman, PhD, and Elissa Dougherty, PhD, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Breakout F2 – Advancing Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Through Statewide Leadership, Collaboration, and Evaluation

We will provide the historical context for one state’s efforts to advance infant/early childhood mental health consultation (IECMHC) and advance a statewide model of IECMHC, the evaluation process of this model, and current systemwide and policy efforts to advance IECMHC. We will engage participants with interactive content during the session, including polling and discussion questions.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Tiffany Burkhardt, PhD, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago; Amanda M. Walsh, JD, LLM, MSW, Illinois Children’s Mental Health Partnership; and Christine Brambila, AM, Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development

Breakout F3 – Let’s Talk About Prevention: Creating Gender-Affirming and Inclusive Environments

Participants will engage in reflective exercises examining their unconscious biases and how they have been impacted by gender, and orientation, and racial stigma. They will leave holding in mind how they can be the change and the prevention for future generations.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Jennifer Lopez, MS Ed, Miami-Dade Family Learning Partnership; and Lina Acosta-Sandaal, MA, LMFT, Stop Parenting Alone

Breakout F4 – Serving Young Children of Veterans: A Panel Discussion on the Report by the NCTSN-VA Subcommittee

With about 7% of the children you serve military-connected, understanding their needs and the resources available are important. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network-VA Subcommittee reviewed and surveyed the needs of children of Veterans, and will share their outcomes, and they will identify resources and strategies for serving young children in Veteran families.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Julia Yeary, ACSW, LCSW, IMH-E®, ZERO TO THREE; Gregory A. Leskin, PhD, UCLA/Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress; Mayer Bellehsen, PhD, Northwell Health; and Shelley R. Fenstermacher, PhD, Department of Veterans Affairs

Day 04 full schedule

October 28, 2021

Policy Plenary - We Can Get It Done Together: Ensuring Mental Health is a Priority

We are in an exciting moment for infant and early childhood mental health (IECMH) policy, with increased advocacy for the solutions our organization has been working toward for decades. In this plenary session, you will hear voices from across the country, from the families and providers who are doing the hard work, making certain babies and their families have the supports they need to grow up healthy, to the policymakers at the forefront of the effort to craft legislation that can provide increased supports for families and babies.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Lee Johnson III, PhD, ZERO TO THREE

Issue Intensive G – Part 1: Infants and Toddlers in Child Welfare: Using Prevention Policy and Practice to Optimize Outcomes

The child welfare Issue Intensive will focus on the importance of prevention upstream for young children and families at risk of entering the child welfare system. A focus will be on the Family First Prevention Act which emphasizes the importance of children growing up in families and ensures that if a young child must be placed in foster care, they are placed in the most family-like setting possible with much effort made to maintain the relationship with their parent. The Intensive will also explore the direct experiences of child welfare workers providing services for infants and toddlers through their voiced experiences to provide advocacy needed for children, families, and child welfare workers.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Joy Osofsky, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; and Brenda Jones Harden, PhD, University of Maryland, School of Social Work

Issue Intensive H – Part 1: Holding the World’s Youngest Children in Mind: New Models of Support and Reflection for Those on the Humanitarian Frontlines Providing Early Childhood Psychosocial Services—A World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH) and ZERO TO THREE Session

In this global Issue Intensive that will include speakers from five continents, we will take a deeper look at how mental health and child development practitioners promoting resilience and healing in refugee and post-conflict contexts are supported themselves to do this hard work with the families of young children. We will hear about what has been working well and what lessons have been learned, especially how the global early childhood workforce can be sustained through culturally informed models of reflective practice. We will also hear about the changes that need to be made to the system of global humanitarian response so that early childhood is more highly prioritized because more than ever—in a world of climate change, mass movement, and conflict—infants and toddlers cannot wait for responsive and trauma-sensitive care to reach them.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Campbell Paul, MBBS, FRANZCP, Cert Child Adol Child Psych, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne and President of WAIMH; Astrid Berg, MBChB (Pret), FFPsych (SA), MPhil (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry), President-Elect WAIMH, South Africa; Vilma Reyes, PsyD, UCSF Child Trauma Research Program, Attachment Seeds program in Colombia; Erum Mariam, PhD, Institute for Educational Development, BRAC University in Bangladesh; and Lucy Bassett, MA Law and Diplomacy (MALD), MS, Humanitarian Collaborative, University of Virginia

Issue Intensive G – Part 2: Infants and Toddlers in Child Welfare: Using Prevention Policy and Practice to Optimize Outcomes

The child welfare Issue Intensive will focus on the importance of prevention upstream for young children and families at risk of entering the child welfare system. A focus will be on the Family First Prevention Act which emphasizes the importance of children growing up in families and ensures that if a young child must be placed in foster care, they are placed in the most family-like setting possible with much effort made to maintain the relationship with their parent. The Intensive will also explore the direct experiences of child welfare workers providing services for infants and toddlers through their voiced experiences to provide advocacy needed for children, families, and child welfare workers.

P-5 Icons_Dom 4

Joy Osofsky, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; and Brenda Jones Harden, PhD, University of Maryland, School of Social Work

Issue Intensive H – Part 2: Holding the World’s Youngest Children in Mind: New Models of Support and Reflection for Those on the Humanitarian Frontlines Providing Early Childhood Psychosocial Services—A World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH) and ZERO TO THREE Session

In this global Issue Intensive that will include speakers from five continents, we will take a deeper look at how mental health and child development practitioners promoting resilience and healing in refugee and post-conflict contexts are supported themselves to do this hard work with the families of young children. We will hear about what has been working well and what lessons have been learned, especially how the global early childhood workforce can be sustained through culturally informed models of reflective practice. We will also hear about the changes that need to be made to the system of global humanitarian response so that early childhood is more highly prioritized because more than ever—in a world of climate change, mass movement, and conflict—infants and toddlers cannot wait for responsive and trauma-sensitive care to reach them.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Campbell Paul, MBBS, FRANZCP, Cert Child Adol Child Psych, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne and President of WAIMH; Astrid Berg, MBChB (Pret), FFPsych (SA), MPhil (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry), President-Elect WAIMH, South Africa; Vilma Reyes, PsyD, UCSF Child Trauma Research Program, Attachment Seeds program in Colombia; Erum Mariam, PhD, Institute for Educational Development, BRAC University in Bangladesh; and Lucy Bassett, MA Law and Diplomacy (MALD), MS, Humanitarian Collaborative, University of Virginia

Breakout G1 – Policy Opportunities to Promote Social-Emotional Development by Leveraging TitleV, Medicaid, and the Medical Home

Based on the recently released "Guide to Leveraging Opportunities Between Title V and Medicaid for Promoting Social-Emotional Development," every state has the opportunity to advance its potential to improve the financing and delivery of services to better support parents and improve social-emotional development in ways that have lifelong impacts.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

David W. Willis, MD, FAAP, Center for the Study of Social Policy; Kay Johnson, EdM, MPH, Johnson Group Consulting; and Stephanie Doyle, MS, Center for the Study of Social Policy

Breakout G2 – The State of Babies in 2021: Before and After the COVID-19 Pandemic

The presenter will discuss the "State of Babies Yearbook," advocacy tools, and resources to increase policymakers’ awareness of the needs of babies and their families; ways to garner support for child- and family-friendly policies; and how to advance responsive national and state policies. Special focus will be looking beyond national and state averages to discern where babies experiences inequities.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Kim Keating, MEd, ZERO TO THREE

Breakout G3 – National Resources to Support Service Coordination in Early Intervention

Join us to learn about how the new Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exception Children and IDEA Infant Toddler Coordinators Association (ITCA), Joint Position Statement on Service Coordination in Early Intervention, which includes the Knowledge and Skills for Service Coordinators guidance document, can be used to provide a foundation for quality service coordination in your state or program.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Melissa P. Schnurr, PhD, Iowa Department of Education; Corinne "Cori" Foley Hill, MEd, Virginia Commonwealth University, Partnership for People With Disabilities; Sarah L. Nichols, Early Intervention Training Program, University of Illinois Children’s Research Center; Kristen Greene, PhD, ZERO TO THREE; and Christina Commons, Infant Toddler Coordinators Association

Breakout G4 – Hand in Hand: Partnering With Families to Advance Community Collaboration

This session will include a brief overview of the Hand in Hand Community Framework for Early Childhood Collaboration and the supporting briefs and stories, developed by the Model Convening Project. The project is a partnership comprised of four national early childhood models, including Family Connects, HealthySteps, Help Me Grow, and Nurse-Family Partnership, with leadership and facilitation from ZERO TO THREE. One of the resources developed is a parent story that features Denise Brown, a graduate of the Nurse-Family Partnership program in Jacksonville, FL. Denise will share her experience and expertise with being a Parent Leader through her participation with many early childhood collaborative efforts. If you are among the countless communities seeking meaningful ways to include or increase parent voice in your community collaboratives, then this is the session for you.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Kimberly Bradley, MPH, MNM, ZERO TO THREE; and Denise Brown, Parent Leader

Breakout G5 – 2021 Emerging Leadership Awards: Innovative Individuals and Powerful Work Making a Difference for Infants, Young Children, and Families

Dig into the visionary, cutting-edge work of the 2021 Emerging Leadership Awardees and how it is transforming practices, policies, and systems. Kathryn Humphries will share recent research highlighting the importance of early caregiving experiences and discuss future directions in studying children and families to support positive development. Nat Vikitsreth will discuss how she uses self-reflection, storytelling, and somatic community practice with caregivers of young children, equipping them to practice social justice and address intergenerational family healing at the same time. Ashley McCormick will discuss how associations of infant mental health can serve as an access point to the birth to 3 workforce and are uniquely positioned to directly impact the composition of the field, strengthening service delivery systems.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Kathryn Humphreys, PhD, Vanderbilt University; Nat Vikitsreth, DT, EdM, LSW, CEIM, Come Back to Care; and Ashley McCormick, LMSW, IECMH-E®, Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health

Baby Talk 10 – Oh Baby You, You Need a Lawyer!

Research shows that high-quality legal representation yields improved outcomes for all children involved with the child welfare system. Participants will learn that very young children have legal rights, just as adults, that warrant the protections available through effective legal representation

P-5 Icons_Dom 7

Natalece Washington, JD, CWLS, National Association of Counsel for Children

Baby Talk 11 – What Does It Really Take to Engage the Business Community in Early Childhood Advocacy?

Learn about Bosses for Babies, an initiative that gathers Florida business leaders to take action for early childhood with their time, talent, or treasure. Learn what works and what to avoid when engaging businesses in your advocacy work and take home concrete ideas for your organization.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Madeleine K. Thakur, The Children's Movement of Florida

Baby Talk 12 – Authentically Integrating Family Voice Into Prenatal-to-3 Policy and Advocacy

Explore learnings from a state and national environmental scan to inform how you can integrate family voice into your prenatal-to-3 programmatic, policy development, and advocacy work. Participants will leave with an evidence-base, key state and national examples of family engagement models, and knowledge of best practices, opportunities, and challenges.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Lynanne Gutierrez, Esq, Groundwork Ohio

Breakout H1 – Powering Up for Babies: Assessing Florida’s Capacity to Support Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health

The Florida 2020 Statewide Capacity Assessment of Supports for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health (IECMH) was designed to promote equity-oriented, community-centered, cross-system capacity building. Participants will reflect on the process and findings to identify the opportunity space for families, communities, and formal systems to collaborate around IECMH.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Allison Pinto, PhD, Jennifer Marshall, PhD, and Emily Shaffer-Hudkins, PhD, University of South Florida

Breakout H2 – Be A Big—Digital—Voice for Little Kids!

Digital advocacy is a powerful way to Be a Big Voice for Little Kids. Join this quick session to hear from ZERO TO THREE’s advocacy team about the impact of digital advocacy and how you can take easy and effective steps online to help policymakers Think Babies!

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Amanda Perez, MSW, ZERO TO THREE

Breakout H3 – State Action to Support Early Educators: Progress and Pitfalls

Join a discussion of the 2020 Early Childhood Workforce Index, which describes early childhood employment conditions and policies in every state. Participants will learn about new analyses and policy recommendations, and how to apply tools like the interactive map and state profiles to support advocacy for early educators.

P-5 Icons_Dom 6

Krista Olson, MA, and Caitlin McLean, PhD, Center for the Study of Child Care Employment

Breakout H4 – Promoting IECMH Policies and Practices Within Early Intervention (IDEA Part C)

Participants will learn how a number of states and communities have implemented infant and early childhood mental health (IECMH) policies and practices within early intervention (IDEA Part C) to support healthy social and emotional development and explore case examples of infants and toddlers in EI and their families who can benefit from IECMH services.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Andy Gomm, MSW, Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center, University of North Carolina; Sharon Loza, PhD, North Carolina Infant-Toddler Program (IDEA Part C); and Meghan Schmelzer, LMSW, IMH-E® (III), ZERO TO THREE

Day 05 full schedule

October 29, 2021

Keynote - Changing the Media Narrative and Healing the Most Vulnerable

In this dynamic and uplifting speech, Maria will talk about how important it is to think about a future where white America will no longer be a majority and everyone learns about true equality and representation. This is a moment to think about data that will give us hope and making sure that we take care of ourselves before we take care of the rest of the world and the country. But we can do both! Based on personal experiences in her reporting and recent trips around the country, Maria will provide context for concern and also for joy about the future.

P-5 Icons_Dom 8

Maria Hinojosa, Emmy-Winning Journalist

Join us for pre-conference week events!

Check out our Virtual Annual Conference platform, complete a scavenger hunt, visit exhbitors’ booths, and participate in author meet & greets, and the first-time attendee reception.